Traditionally, content was edited and tailored for the public through news editors, authors, and other kinds of content creators. However, not all information content requires creative authoring or editing. Through recent technological developments, truth is found in philosopher Marshall McLuhan's idea of a global village; new technologies allow for instantaneous movement of information from every corner to every point at the same time[4] has caused the globe to be contracted into a village by electric technology,[5] such as mobile phones and automated sensors. These new technologies can record events anywhere for publishing and converting in order to potentially reach a global audience on channels such as YouTube. Such recorded or transmitted information and visuals can be referred to as content. Content is no longer a product of only reputable sources; new technology has made primary sources of content more readily available to all. For example, a video of a politician giving a speech compared to an article written by a reporter who witnessed the speech. Media production and delivery technology may potentially enhance the value of content by formatting, filtering, and combining original sources of content for new audiences with new contexts. The greatest value for a given source of content for a specific audience is often found through such electronic reworking of content as dynamic and real-time as the trends that fuel its interest. Less emphasis on value from content stored for possible use in its original form, and more emphasis on rapid re-purposing, reuse, and redeployment has led many publishers and media producers to view their primary function less as originators and more as transformers of content. Thus, one finds out that institutions, that used to focus on publishing printed materials, are now publishing both databases and software to combine content from various sources for a wider-variety of audiences.

Our Client Feedback


Quick Contact

For Best Services